5 Ways To Get Outdoors This Spring

5 Ways To Get Outdoors This Spring

by Andrea Haas

Team member EvoOutdoors/Huntress View

Spring is near and soon the weather will be warming up, flowers will be blooming and everything will be turning green. Why not get out of the house and enjoy the great outdoors? Here’s a list of 5 fun outdoor activities to try this spring!

  • Geo-caching

Geo-caching is hunting for and finding a hidden object by means of GPS coordinates posted on a website. You will need to go to www.geocaching.com and register for a free membership, enter your zip code to search for geocaches in your area, and then enter the coordinates of the geocache into your GPS device. Basically, geocaching is a real world outdoor treasure hunting game! Not only would it be fun to try and find each hidden geocache, you will get to enjoy the different scenery along the way to the different locations!

  • Morel Mushroom Hunting

DSC_0016_copy2Morel mushrooms usually start to pop up around April, when the temperature starts to stay in the 60’s. Not only are they fun to look for, they taste amazing! Trust me, they are worth searching for.

South facing slopes will get more sun and that’s where you will probably find the first ones. I had the best luck finding them under oak trees on my property last year, but they also tend to grow under Elm, Ash and Poplar trees. Searching for them on a muggy day after a rain shower will probably be your best bet. Once you find one, keep looking around that area, as you will likely find more close by! Once you get home soak them in water for a couple of hours to rinse out any bugs and then they’re ready to eat!

Here is how I made mine: (link for recipe, or feel free to post the recipe in this blog) http://huntressview.blogspot.com/2015/04/fried-morel-mushrooms-recipe.html

  • Photography

Learning your way around a digital camera can be tricky, but you don’t have to be a professional photographer to enjoy taking pictures. I feel one of the best ways to learn is to just get outside and do it! I have had a digital camera for a few years but have never tried to use it outside of auto mode until about a month ago. Taking pictures of wildlife has proven to be a great way for me to learn and spring is a great time of year to do just that!

I started by getting my camera off of auto and taking multiple pictures of the same object, but changing the settings as I go. This helped me identify the effect that each setting change had on each photo.  After that, I tried photographing wildlife. I noticed there had been a lot of ducks on our pond so I set up a ground blind on the pond bank and got in it the following weekend before the ducks arrived at sunrise. I was surprised that they paid no attention to me and I actually got some decent photos for my first try off of auto!

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  • Remote Photography

11150154_1072240759459432_4198246813710117181_nIf you’d like to get unique photos of wildlife but don’t want to take the pictures yourself, I recommend my personal favorite outdoor hobby, trail camming, aka remote photography.  Trail cameras are mostly used by hunters to scout for wildlife during hunting season but you don’t have to be a hunter to enjoy using them! Some of my favorite trail camera pictures are from spring and summer when there’s not even a hunting season open.

I__00034If you have private property, try finding a unique spot to hang a camera and see what shows up! You’ll be surprised at the variety of wildlife that you’ll get on camera that you never even knew were there!

  • Stand Up Paddle Boarding (SUP)

To paddle board you stand on the board, which looks similar to a surf board, with a paddle in hand and use the paddle to propel yourself forward on the water. This can be done on the ocean, lake or river and is an excellent full body workout!

Some places will rent you the equipment that you’ll need, that way you won’t have to go out and buy it all yourself. If you do choose to buy the equipment, here’s what you will need:

-Stand up paddle board

-Paddle

-Life jacket or personal flotation device

-Leash (It attaches your SUP to you, in case you fall off)

Although I have yet to try paddle boarding for myself, it is something that I plan on trying this year! I’ve heard from people who have tried it that since you are standing at your full height on the paddle board you get a better view of the surroundings than if you were sitting in a boat, and you are able to see the fish swimming below you!

My friend Samantha Andrews shared this photo with me on her SUP

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Spring is a great time to get outside and try something new. Whether you live in the country or in the city, you should be able to find somewhere close to you to try at least one of these outdoor activities!

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“During the months leading up to hunting season I can be found on our tractor plowing and disking our fields, planting food plots, scouting for deer sign, hanging tree stands and checking trail cams. By being a part of this preparation process I have a deeper appreciation for hunting and more respect for the animals that I harvest.” -Andrea Haas

 

Women’s First Lite Merino Wool Base Layers Review

Women’s First Lite Merino Wool Base Layers Review

By EvoOutdoors team member Andrea Haas

Original Post: Huntress View

When I first started hunting about 10 years ago, my hunting attire consisted of bulky men’s camo over a couple pairs of long johns as base layers, depending on the weather. Needless to say, that system just didn’t work for me and I was happy to see that soon women’s hunting apparel companies started to appear, like SHE Outdoor Apparel and Prois. But one thing was still lacking for me: good quality women’s base layers.

Base layers are crucial when the temperatures really start to drop in the winter and can either make or break a hunt. I spend hours in the tree stand and need to be able to withstand the elements, rather than being forced to pack up and head home at prime time because I’m too cold. This happened to me last season and cost me a very nice 9 point with my bow.

Thankfully in 2015 First Lite came out with new Merino Wool base layers specifically for women and I was able to put them to the test. Over the years I have tried a few other brands of base layers but I feel none of them performed as well as the First Lite base layers did in regards to thermoregulation, scent control and moisture wicking ability, which is exactly what Merino Wool is known for. They were soft and comfortable without any itching like what you may think of when you hear the word “wool”. Not only did they perform well in the cold, they did just as well in temperatures over 80 degrees by wicking away moisture; I didn’t sweat at all while walking to my tree stand. I was extremely impressed!

Base Layer Options

Firstlite collage

Lupine Crew Top and Larkspur Full Length Bottoms in Sage Green

The Syringa Shorts can be worn underneath your full length bottoms as undergarments, or can be worn alone as a base layer in warmer weather under your outer layer pants.The top layers consist of the Lupine Crew Top and Artemis Hoody, and the bottom layers consist of the Larkspur Full Length Bottomsand the Syringa Short. If you are considering purchasing the base layers, I would at the very least, recommend the Lupine Crew and Larkspur Bottoms.

The Artemis Hoody can be worn as a base layer top, or over the Lupine Crew top as a mid layer.

Artemis Hoody with Lupine Crew Top underneath, and Syringa Shorts

Artemis Hoody with Lupine Crew Top underneath, and Syringa Shorts

I used the sizing chart on the First Lite website to determine what size I needed based on my measurements. I am 5’3”, 110 pounds and I went with an XS in the Larkspur Full Length Bottoms and the Syringa Short, and a Small in both the Lupine Crew Top & Artemis Hoody. I originally ordered an XS in the Lupine Crew top but it was just a little smaller than what I like so I ordered a small instead and it fit perfect.

Sizing/Fit

I found that the bottoms fit best when I went down a size smaller than what I would normally wear, and that the tops fit best when I went up a size larger. The bottoms seemed to stretch out just a tad after being worn a time or two, but shrink back to normal after being washed. I love that the waistband on the bottoms stretches with you and does not dig in too tight on your hips or mid section, creating the dreaded “muffin top”. Both of the tops have thumb holes in the arm cuffs for added warmth and concealment, and helps keep them from rolling up whenever you put on your outer layers.

These are available in sizes XS to XL.

Color Options

There are 3 solid colors available (Black, Golden and Sage Green) and 4 camo patterns (ASAT, RealTree Xtra, RealTree Max-1 and First Lite Fusion). I ordered my base layers in Sage Green and the Artemis Hoody in the new First Lite Fusion camo pattern.

Artemis Hoody in First Lite Fusion

Artemis Hoody in First Lite Fusion

First Lite Accessories

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Talus Fingerless Merino Glove in Dry Earth

There are several other First Lite apparel items that have became my hunting staples, the Talus Fingerless Merino Gloves, theMountain AthleteCold Weather Sock and the First Lite Beanie. The gloves have open fingers, which I prefer for bow hunting, and have worked great for me all season long. In late season when it gets colder, I recommend either a full glove, or adding a hand muff for added warmth. The socks work great to wick away sweat which is great for both warm and cold temperatures. The beanie is fairly lightweight & what I like to wear during early bow season when it is still pretty warm.

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First Lite Beanie and Lupine Crew

The First Lite Women’s Base Layers have played a crucial role in my hunting success this season. I’ve been able to hunt more comfortably in both the cold and the heat, and have even noticed a big decrease in the amount of times I have been winded by deer thanks to the merino wool’s natural resistance to odor. I highly recommend these for any female hunter looking to extend their time in the field!

Success In The Field

Pheasant Hunting: I wore the Lupine Crew & Artemis Hoody

Pheasant Hunting: I wore the Lupine Crew & Artemis Hoody

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Rifle season doe: I wore the First Lite Lupine Crew top, Larkspur Bottoms & Talus Fingerless Gloves

Duck Hunting: I wore the Lupine Crew, Artemis Hoody and Larkspur Bottoms

Duck Hunting: I wore the Lupine Crew, Artemis Hoody and Larkspur Bottoms

First Lite products available at EvoOutdoors.

Get to know team member Andrea Haas via her hunting blog and Facebook page called Huntress View where she shares her hunting stories and gives hunting tips and advice. “I feel that more women will become involved in hunting and the outdoors if they are able to learn about it from other women.” -Andrea Haas

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Sporting Clays: How to get started

I shoulder my shotgun and yell “pull”!

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I take my aim and miss the first two clays. I’m at my very first sporting clay competition and to say that I’m nervous is an understatement. I hear encouraging words from the other competitors behind me as I shoulder my gun again and prepare for the next two clays. Again, I yell “pull”, but this time I bust both clays! The other competitors in my group start cheering for me and giving me high fives, easing my nerves as we walk to the second station.

I recently shot at the 16th Annual Women’s Charity Shotgun Event hosted by the Ozark Shooters Sports Complex in Branson, MO. The proceeds from this shoot went to the Shriner’s Hospital for Children, a hospital that provides high quality care to children in need, regardless of the family’s ability to pay.

Before now my only experience in this area was shooting trap in my backyard a few times, as well as hunting doves, pheasants and crows. One thing that I truly believe is that you learn the most by forcing yourself to get out of your comfort zone. Going into this sporting clay competition by myself, not knowing what to expect was definitely a little uncomfortable for me, but I am so glad that I did it!

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The women competing in this event were not only very friendly and encouraging, they were excellent shooters and I was happy that they were willing to give me some pointers. One tip was to lift my right elbow up just a little higher & keep it parallel to the ground. This creates a “pocket” in your shoulder that the shotgun fits into better which helps with recoil, especially after shooting 50 shells. I learned that other shooters really want to help you and want to see you succeed. Sure, it’s a competition, but it’s all in good fun and for a great cause.

For those like me that are new to sporting clay shooting, here’s a basic run down on what to expect:

How It Works

AndiEvo4_copyOut of all the shotgun sports, sporting clays is the closest thing to actual field hunting. With skeet and trap you have clays thrown at generalized distances and angles each time. Sporting clays are designed to simulate actual wing shooting of ducks, pheasants and other upland birds. The clays can be thrown from any direction, at any speed and any angle. Some clays even vary in size, giving you the next best thing to real world hunting conditions.

Sporting clays are usually shot in squads of 2-6 people and is played over a course of about 10 different shooting stations throughout fields and the natural features of the land. Being from the Ozark Mountains, our stations overlooked some beautiful scenery and was naturally, very hilly. Each person in a squad shoots a determined number of clays, usually around 4-6, before moving on to the next station.

Safety

Like all shooting sports, safety comes first in sporting clays. As soon as you remove your gun from the vehicle, make sure the breech is open and the gun is not loaded. If you shoot an over/under shotgun, make sure you break it open and the barrel is pointed down or up towards the sky. Even if you know the shotgun is not loaded, always treat it as if it is.

Ear and eye protection are also a must any time you are on a sporting clay course.DSC_0071_copy3

Shooting a Round

Once each squad is at their designated first station, hand the score cards to the referee. Before anyone shoots, the referee will show you the targets so you can see how they are being thrown.

Step up to the station when it’s your turn to shoot and load your shotgun. Point it safely towards the firing area and yell “pull” once you are ready. The target is considered a “dead bird” if any part of it is broken. When you are done shooting, make sure the breech is open and exit the station. Remain behind the station until everyone in your squad has finished shooting and is ready to move on.

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Shooting sporting clays is a great way to sharpen your shooting skills and “extend” your hunting season. If you feel sporting clays is something you would like to get involved in, here are a few ways to get started!

Join a Local Club. Check out the National Sporting Clay Association (NSCA) website to search for clubs in your area.

Link: http://www.nssa-nsca.org/index.php/nsca-sporting-clays-shooting/clubs-associations/club-search/

Once a member, you can use your clubs facility on a regular basis and meet other shooters. Like I mentioned above, my experience with meeting other shooters was a positive one. They were very helpful, encouraging, and these ladies could shoot very well!

Join the NSCA. The NSCA is the ultimate resource for all things sporting clays. They are dedicated to getting more people involved in shotgun sports, no matter what level they are at, and promoting healthy competition within its membership.

Shoot In a Competition. I think one of the best ways to improve your shooting skills is to actually shoot in a competition, like I did. You can watch other great shooters and learn from them. Don’t worry about “not being good enough”. You only compete within your own class, so you’re only competing against others that are at the same level as you.

Keep Practicing! Shoot, shoot, and shoot some more! Experience really is the best teacher. Also, if any upland seasons are open, get yourself a tag. I ended up getting 1st place in my class and I feel that my experience with hunting live birds prepared me the most for sporting clays.

-Andrea Haas, Huntress View

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Bow Shooting Tips

Bow Shooting Tips written by Andrea Haas was originally published via The Huntress View



With more & more people getting involved in archery & bow hunting, I feel I should share a few basic, but important, archery tips that help me when shooting my bow.

-The number one, most important thing to me is that you shoot the exact same way each time. Form & consistency is everything so make sure you are anchoring the same way each time. I have a kisser on my bow that really helps find my anchor point quicker each time.

-Loosen up your grip. Gripping the bow too tightly can cause you to torque the bow left or right & make your shooting off.

-Shooting at smaller dots on your targets help improve your accuracy & will help you shoot tighter groups. If you always shoot at the biggest dot on the target & can cause you to get a little sloppy. I like the Mckenzie Shot Blocker.

-For the women bow hunters: Here’s a tip to see if you are pulling back too much weight with your bow: Get your bow & sit down in a chair. Pull your feet up so they aren’t touching the ground & pull your bow back. If you can’t get it back, or are struggling too much, you are pulling too much weight. I only shoot about 45 pounds, and that’s really all you need.

Cold Weather Layering

A women’s hunting apparel guide for when the temps start to plummet! All of the apparel listed here is what works for me when I’m sitting in my deer stand for long hours at a time and what I recommend for long, non-active hunts during the winter months. -Andrea Haas

1.) Prois Sherpa Beanie

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* I love the fit of this beanie. It’s long enough to cover my ears perfectly and doesn’t allow cold air/wind in.

* Available at www.EvoOutdoors.com and www.ProisHunting.com

2.) Prois Sherpa Fleece Neck Gaitor

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* This is great for extra warmth or added camo coverage. I carry this piece into my spring turkey hunting season as well for the added camo coverage.

* Available at www.ProisHunting.com

3.) Base Layers

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* The key to staying warm in cold temps starts with your base layers. You want your base layers to help wick moisture, that way if you sweat while walking to your stand, you won’t freeze later on when it starts to evaporate. Merino Wool is great for wicking moisture and isn’t itchy.

* I recommend The Women’s Expedition Crew top and Bottoms by Minus33, available at www.EvoOutdoors.com

4.) Mid Layers

Cabelas Polartec Top (1)Cabelas Polartec Bottoms (1)

* The Turas Long Sleeve Shirt by Prois is one of my favorite shirts to keep in my hunting gear bag year round. I add this top over my base layer for some extra warmth that’s not bulky at all and is extremely easy to move in. It’s available at www.ProisHunting.com

* In extremely cold temps, I like to add a fleece mid-layer as well and have found this is a really great way to add some extra warmth; and if you find the right layers, you won’t add bulkiness along with it.

* Polartec fleece is my favorite, available at www.cabelas.com

5.) Prois Extreme Pants and Jacket

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* I absolutely love the Prois Etreme Pants and Jacket for cold weather hunting. The wind stops here, ladies! They do an excellent job at stopping the wind and also helps to keep you dry while hunting in rain, snow, sleet and drizzle. Plus, the jacket has an added “duck tail” feature to extend the length and help keep you even dryer.

* Available at www.EvoOutdoors and www.ProisHunting.com

6.) Gloves

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* For bow hunting my personal favorite are the Women’s Bow Ranger by Manzella. They are fleece with a 4-way stretch fabric for a great fit, which also makes them easy to get on and off. They also have a bow-release collar, making them a great choice for bow hunting.

* Available at www.EvoOutdoors.com

7.) Socks

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* A good pair of moisture wicking socks is imperative in order to keep your feet dry and warm. When walking to the stand my feet often start to sweat, which is a bad thing once the sweat starts to evaporate. Merino Wool is known for its moisture-wicking abilities and helps keep my feet dry and warm.

* The Day Hiker Sock by Minus33 are my favorite. Available at www.EvoOutdoors.com

8.) ThermaCELL Heated Insoles

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* If my feet do start to get cold in the stand, I love these rechargable heated insoles by ThermaCELL. Just replace the insole to your boots with these (you can also cut these to make them fit better). You can adjust the temperature to high or medium with a small remote that easily fits in your pocket.

* Available at www.BassPro.com

9.) Women’s Muck Woody Max Boots

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* These have a 100% waterproof rubber outsole, and are fleece lined on the inside. These fit close to your fit to keep cold air from getting in.

* Available at www.cabelas.com

Pheasant Hunting Gear List for Women

A head-to-toe pheasant hunting gear list written by EvoOutdoors ProStaff Team member Andrea Haas.

Prois Reversible Sherpa Fleece Vest and Blaze Orange Cap

For the ladies! All of the gear listed here are my personal favorites for pheasant hunting and would be a good option for most upland hunts.

1) Blaze Orange Hat

  • I prefer to wear a blaze orange ball cap but it’s a good idea to bring along a blaze beanie as well, depending on the wind and the temperature!
  • This Blaze Orange Cap with Waxed Bill from Prois is a great option, available for $26.99

Prois Blaze Orange Hat with Waxed Bill

2) Blaze Orange Vest / Upland Vest

  • The Prois Reversible Sherpa Fleece Vest is one of my hunting staples because I can use it year round and for multiple hunts. One side is blaze orange fleece, perfect for rifle season or upland hunting. The other side is camoflauge, making it great for hunting, deer, elk and other game. It also has scapular pockets designed to hold activated hand warmers! It is available at EvoOutdoors for $170.10

Prois Reversible Sherpa Fleece Vest

  • Another great vest option is the Badlands Upland Vest Pack. It’s lightweight, has multiple pockets perfect for holding shotgun shells and other loose items. It is available at Prois for $179.99

Badlands Upland Vest Pack

3) Long Sleeve Shirt

  • If the weather is warmer I recommend a lightweight top that wicks moisture. My favorite is the Prois Ultra Long Sleeve Shirt available at EvoOutdoors for $50.40. You can pick from Realtree AP, Realtree Max-1 or Black.

Prois Ultra Long Sleeve Shirt

4) Jacket

  • If the weather turns cool, keep the above top on as a layering piece & add a jacket. Last season on the cooler/windier days I paired the above top with the Prois Pro-Edition Jacket and that was perfect. You can find the Prois Pro-Edition Jacket at EvoOutdoors for $215.10

Prois Pro-Edition Jacket

5) Brush Pants

  • The Prois High Plains Brush Pants are a comfortable, yet durable option for the female upland hunter! They have Cordura facings, pleated knees, boot zippers, multiple pockets, and the waist rests at the natural waistline. These are available in Khaki at EvoOutdoors, or at Prois in Olive, $161.10 to $179.99

Prois High Plains Brush Pants

6) Gloves

  • I found on my first pheasant hunt that despite warmer temperatures, the wind can still cut like a knife! For days like this fleece gloves are perfect. The Women’s Ranger Glove by Manzella are fleece with a 4-way stretch fabric for a great fit. You can find these in size S/M or M/L at EvoOutdoors for $22.00

Women’s Ranger Glove by Manzella

7) Socks

  • A good pair of moisture-wicking socks are imperative for a long, active hunt like pheasant hunting. Whether it’s warm or cold you want your feet to stay dry! The Day Hiker Sock by Minus33 is made of merino wool which is known for keeping your feet dry and comfortable in any weather condition. You can get these socks from EvoOutdoors for only $13.00

Day Hiker Sock by Minus33

8) Boots

  • A good pair of waterproof boots are a must for pheasant hunting. My personal favorite for pheasant hunting in the flat, Kansas plains are these SHE Outdoor Avilla 16″ Waterproof Rubber Boots. They are fully lined with 5mm Neoprene and are easy to pull on & off. I like that they are taller, making it a good option for hunting in deep snow. I walked the pheasant fields for miles at a time & had no problem with them rubbing my feet or creating blisters. They are available at Bass Pro Shop for $99.99

SHE Outdoor Avilla Boot

9) Shotgun Case

  • You definitely need a shotgun case to protect your shotgun while transporting it from your home to the field. The Tenzing TZ SS54 Shotgun Case has a soft water-resistant outer shell and a fully surrounding 1″ foam interior padding. You can find this case at EvoOutdoors for $99

SHE Outdoor Avilla Boot

10) Pets

  • Don’t forget about your pet! If you hunt with dogs keep them protected from the elements in the Pointer Dog Vest by Rivers West. It’s made with micro fleece, very insulated and waterproof. One great feature is the top zipper has an inside fleece fly to keep your dog’s hair from getting caught in the zipper! It is available at EvoOutdoors for $49.00

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I hope you find this gear list helpful when planning your next upland hunt!

-Andrea Haas

Be sure to check out Andrea and other women hunters like her on the Huntress View blog.

 

How do you keep cool when making the shot?

Andrea Haas ProStaff EvoOutdoorsOne of the questions that I am often asked by women who are interested in bow hunting for the first time is, “How do you keep your cool when making the shot?” They often say “I just don’t think I would be able to shoot a deer with a bow”, or “It just seems so hard, I don’t think I would be able to pull it off”. While I love encouraging other women to get involved in hunting, I will be honest when I say that yes, bowhunting is very hard. If it was easy everyone would be doing it! While a successful bow hunt is difficult to pull off, it is definitely very attainable with some hard work, determination and practice. Lots and lots of practice!

Thinking back to my very first bow season, I began by shooting my bow every day from about May to opening day in September. When you start shooting your bow pay extra attention to getting down proper form and finding your anchor point. After a while this becomes second nature and you won’t even have to think about it, you just do it every time. I believe in quality over quantity when it comes to target practice. Shooting a few arrows each night is far better than shooting multiple arrows and letting yourself get tired and your form sloppy.

Practing proper form is essential for success

Practing proper form is essential for success

Practice with the equipment you know you will be hunting with. My bow is sighted in using 100 grain broad heads, all the same brand. All of my arrows are the same brand, weight & straightness, and the fletchings are the same on each arrow. I want to know that no matter what arrow I use in my quiver, each one is going to shoot the same way. Bow hunting is a huge challenge and making yourself familiar and comfortable with your weapon is half the battle.

Take into consideration the gear you will be hunting in and practice shooting in it. When you are shooting in your back yard you are probably shooting in jeans and a t-shirt. But when you are hunting you usually have on multiple layers, making it a little more difficult to pull your bow back and find your anchor point. This past season I was full draw on a great buck and had a clothing mishap that forced me to pass on the shot. If I had practiced in that particular clothing item I would have known that it was something I preferred not to bow hunt in and would have filled my deer tag a LOT earlier in the season!

Another pre-season shooting tip is to practice shooting from a tree stand or ground blind, whichever you are going to be hunting out of. If you’ll be hunting from a tree stand practice shooting from one and get used to shooting at an angle. If you’ll be hunting out of a ground blind, practice while sitting down or from your knees. If you are able to, get in the blind and practice shooting out of it. With ground blinds you have a smaller window to shoot out of and it takes some getting used to.

Practicing the above tips should help ease some of your bow hunting jitters and make you more prepared for an actual hunt. When a deer steps out and you are ready to shoot, hopefully all of this will come back to you automatically so you can focus on making a good shot. To me, shot placement and remembering your anchor point when shooting at an animal are THE most important things to focus on. When I shot my first deer with a bow, I had mosquitoes swarming around my head and biting my face as I was preparing to make the shot, but thanks to all my practice I was able to stay focused and make a clean shot.

My friend Allison O’Nan and Field Staff for EvoOutdoors, shared some of her tips with me that help her stay calm when bow hunting:

  • Participating in 3D archery tournaments or league where you are feeling under pressure will help you to work through the jitters when it comes time to shooting game.
  • Visualize making the shot when you are at full draw. Confidence is the key! But don’t get over confident and cause yourself to extend pass your own shooting limits.
  • Practice breathing techniques every time you shoot, even in your own back yard. Breathing through my shots keeps my mind clear and hand steady. As I inhale/exhale I pass over my target three times before I settle in and release my arrow.
  • Chewing gum is a great way to release nervous energy. However, for bow hunting, maybe try a brand such as Gum-O-Flage.

Allison O’Nan | Field Staff for EvoOutdoorsI’ve had a lot of successful hunts, but have found that most of my unsuccessful ones were due to lack of focus. For me, the excitement/nervousness that I feel right before I shoot a deer is always there. It was there on my very first bow hunt, my last hunt and will be on my next. But the above tips have really helped me control my excitement and keep my cool in the heat of the moment when a shot presents itself.

2014 Archery deer harvest

2014 Archery deer harvest

Andrea Haas | ProStaff EvoOutdoors